Latest News -

Fri, Dec 26, 2014

MRS. MURFREESBORO: Twitter lingo sure has changed communication

Comment   Email   Print

With rapid advances in technology and the popularity of texting, numerous new terms and acronyms have been cropping up in print and in the digital world.

While I am familiar with many of them, there are many that I do not understand. But, I have been doing a little investigating and would like to share some of my insight with you.

Acronyms are useful when texting.

Among the terms I can decipher are “srsly,” which is often used Twitter, and “unlike” because they’re fairly logical.

Twitter is a social networking service that lets users send messages, photos and ideas via cell phones to people with whom they want to be connected. Twitter’s messages are limited to 140 characters.

Although I have rarely used it, I set up a Twitter account when I was enjoying time at the beach with a teenager a couple of years ago. However, my young adult children truly enjoy their Twitter accounts and have tried to get me more involved.

I have more than enough connections to the outside world than I want now, but if I decide I want to find out what Martha Stewart or Katie Couric are up to these days I know I can use Twitter to show me.

My children are also into Instagram, a similarly downloaded device that sends a photo from your phone via text message to Facebook or Twitter. The beauty of any of these programs is that you can erase photos later if desired.

“Gramming” is the term for sending an Instagram photo.

“Srsly” is an abbreviation for “seriously” in text communication and “unlike” means that you can click on a button on your Facebook page to unfriend someone whose posts you no longer want to follow.

At Nelson Mandela’s funeral President Barack Obama, the prime minister of Denmark and British Prime Minister David Cameron were caught taking a “selfie,” a term with that I was not familiar. The moment captured international attention.

Apparently, a “selfie” is a photo of yourself that you have taken and shared with others.

The above world leaders were criticized in some circles for having made light of the solemnity of Mandela’s funeral, but I’m sure many young people around the world identified with them.

I assumed that the term “twerk” would involve sending some messages via text but that is not so.

Twerking is a term used for a type of erotic dancing that gained notoriety when it was performed by Miley Cyrus, the former Disney World role model for teenagers, at the MTV Video Music Awards.

I sure am glad that I haven’t thrown that term around in error.

The term "iOS," internet over satellite, refers to the operating system that supports iPhones, iPads and other Apple devices, and as the systems are upgraded the numbers move up. iOS 7.0.4 is the most current one.

If your device uses iOS5 or later, you can easily enable emoticons to enhance your text messages.

An Emoji, or emoticon, is a symbol used to describe sentiments such as a happy face, a sad face, a heart or a thumbs up.

To access them go to settings, general, then tap keyboard, keyboard and tap emoji. A symbol that looks like a globe will show on the bottom row of your keyboard to the left of the spacebar.  By tapping that you open more emoticons than you could possibly use and tapping on the one you want engages it.

Just retap the “globe” when you are ready to use letters again.

Well, I "apols" (apologizes) to those who have no desire to know all this, but the beauty of today’s world is that you can be as open or closed "amap" (as much as possible) to this technology as you like.

But "srsly," although all the above might be too much information, "yolo" (you only live once), and if you have a "fomo" (fear of missing out), this lingo can give you "gist" (great ideas for starting things).

Read more from:
Columnists
Tags: 
Mrs Murfreesboro, Technology, Voices
Share: 
Comment   Email   Print
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software