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LETTER: Capitalism has caused injustice

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Why is it if a person with a Muslim name speaks out against injustice in our society, that person is accused of trying to impose Shariah Law?

According to Islam, Muslims are obligated to obey the laws of their land and cannot force Islamic laws anywhere, not even in Muslim majority lands - the people must vote it in.

But as Muslims, we are required to stand up against oppression in the countries we live in and at the hands of the governments that are supposed to represent us.

Yes, oppression is rampant in Muslim majority countries also, and if I were living there, my focus would be on protesting the brutal monarchies of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and even Libya.

As I see it, while American citizens (I am a U.S. citizen by birth) are guaranteed many rights in writing through the U.S. Constitution, those rights have not been able to translate into reality because of a capitalistic system that demands the concentration of wealth and power into the hands of the few. This system controls our political, legal, economic and social arenas to achieve this goal.

American citizens are guaranteed rights to life, liberty and property on paper according to the Fourteenth Amendment, but statistics show that is far from reality for too many people.

As far as life goes, for example, one African-American is extrajudicially killed by police, security guards and vigilantes every 39 hours.

As for liberty, America has the highest incarceration rate in the world with 5 percent of the world’s population, but 25 percent of the world’s prison population.

Property problems are rampant with more people getting kicked out of their properties, spiking homelessness, especially among the young and the veterans. Unbelievably, 1 in 3 homeless people in America are U.S. military veterans.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

The 1 percent have been able to get away with their monopolization by keeping the rest of us bickering and divided along religious, racial and political lines.

To truly become one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all, we must unite against injustice.

Salina Khan
Murfreesboro, Tenn.

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Capitalism, Economy, Finance, Islam, Letter to the Editor, Politics, Socialism
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October 29, 2012 at 7:34am
"As far as life goes, for example, one African-American is extrajudicially killed by police, security guards and vigilantes every 39 hours."
Salina- If you check the stats I think that (African-Amaricans) kill each other at a far greater rate.
October 30, 2012 at 7:21am
The stats that I mentioned show that Blacks kill each other at an average rate of at least one every hour. Salina comes off as being an uniformed and immature person with a chip on her shoulder.
November 01, 2012 at 12:01pm
Chip indeed.

"Property problems are rampant with more people getting kicked out of their properties, spiking homelessness, especially among the young and the veterans. Unbelievably, 1 in 3 homeless people in America are U.S. military veterans."

Read more than one source.

Homelessness

Using the most recently available national data on homelessness, the 2009 and 2011 point-in-time counts as reported by jurisdictions to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the report chronicles the changes in overall homelessness and in homelessness among subpopulations between 2009 and 2011. Point-in-time count methodologies vary and are imperfect and as such the aggregated numbers do not represent a precise count of homeless people. The counts, however, when compared over time, provide a way to assess whether the homeless population has increased or decreased.

The nation’s homeless population decreased 1 percent, or by about 7,000 people; it went from 643,067 in 2009 to 636,017 in 2011. There were a decreased number of people experiencing homelessness in most of the subpopulations examined in this report: families, individuals in families, chronic, and individuals. The only increase was among those unsheltered.
The largest decrease was among homeless veterans, whose population declined 11 percent. The number of homeless veterans went from 75,609 in 2009 to 67,495 in 2011, a reduction of about 8,000.
The national rate of homelessness was 21 homeless people per 10,000 people in the general population. The rate for veterans was 31 homeless veterans per 10,000 veterans in the general population.
Chronic homelessness decreased by 3 percent from 110,911 in 2009 to 107,148 in 2011. The chronically homeless population has decreased by 13 percent since 2007. The decrease is associated with an increase in the number of permanent supportive housing beds from 188,636 in 2007 to 266,968 in 2011. Permanent supportive housing ends chronic homelessness.
A majority of homeless people counted were in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs, but nearly 4 in 10 were unsheltered, living on the streets, or in cars, abandoned buildings, or other places not intended for human habitation. The unsheltered population increased by 2 percent from 239,759 in 2009 to 243,701 in 2011, the only subpopulation to increase.
The number of individuals in homeless families decreased by 1 percent nationally, but increased by 20 percent or more in 11 states.
While the homeless population decreased nationally, it increased in 24 states and the District of Columbia.
http://www.endhomelessness.org/library/entry/the-state-of-homelessness-in-america-2012
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