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Thu, Dec 18, 2014

BURRISS: Take control of your online choices

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With the beginning of the new year, it is time for all those new year's resolutions, those promises we are going to make to try to make our lives better.

Now, if letters to the editor are any indication, it appears there is some kind of consensus growing that the republic is on the verge of collapse, and civilization as we know it will soon come to an end. And to combat this demise, there appears to be a growing consensus that someone should quote "do something" about the Internet.

So, in the spirit of making New Year's resolutions, I would like to offer a few suggestions for how these people can cope with what they consider to be the open sewer flowing into their homes.

First, I suggest they stop visiting offensive sites. If you don't like what's coming across the screen, go to another site. There are thousands, if not millions of sites dealing with every imaginable topic that might be considered G- or PG-rated.

Second, I suggest that parents begin to exercise a little more parental authority, and practice more control over what they allow their children to watch. "Just say no" can work equally as well for the Internet as it does for drugs.

A third option is not to access the Internet at all. Read a book, go for a walk, play games with the children. Do some other family things, and do them together. Of course, this also means parents would have to spend a little more time with their children. But I always thought that's what being a parent is all about.

Now, I don't for one minute think the Internet is leading to the downfall of American society. Yes, some sites may be offensive for any number of reasons. Yes, some sites are certainly inappropriate for any number of age, gender, ethnicity or religious categories.

But, if you don't like it, simply take control of the situation and watch, or do, something else. No one is forcing anyone to access anything on the Internet. And that's what choice is all about.

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January 09, 2014 at 8:08am
I think that Larry is operating a bit on the backside of the curve. I don\'t know what (letters) he is referencing, but LTEs are a dying medium. The (letters) used to take issue, to a large degree, to editorial opinion and local news stories. The Editorials today are pretty dull, vanilla like chit-chat. When Sam Stockard was with a local paper he could stir up a fury that resulted in more letters in one week than we see now in a month.Online experience is not the problem, it is that the interst and emotions that used to be shared in letters is found hidden in \"social media\", The art of writng or conversation itself has given way to gossip.
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